Asteroid impact moved the Moon’s north and south poles by about 186 miles in 4.25 billion years

Scientists have revealed in a new study that ancient collisions with asteroids actually drove the Moon’s north and south sides about 186 miles.

A team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland used computer simulations to ‘erase’ thousands of craters from the lunar surface – as if they were going back to a time of 4.25 billion years ago when craters did not exist.

His work led him to discover that asteroid impacts ‘wandered’ the location of the poles by 10 degrees in latitude, or about 186 miles. To put that in perspective, the total diameter of the Moon is 2,159 miles.

These wandering poles could teach scientists more about the poles, which are considered a region more prized because of the frozen water discovered there.

Scientists reveal in a new study that ancient collisions with asteroids actually drove about 186 miles on the north and south sides of the Moon.

Scientists reveal in a new study that ancient collisions with asteroids actually drove about 186 miles on the north and south sides of the Moon.

A team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland used computer simulations to 'erase' thousands of craters from the lunar surface.  GRAIL gravity model GRGM1200B (left), and GRGM1200B with 5197 crater gravity anomalies removed (right)

A team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland used computer simulations to ‘erase’ thousands of craters from the lunar surface. GRAIL gravity model GRGM1200B (left), and GRGM1200B with 5197 crater gravity anomalies removed (right)

His work led him to discover that asteroid impacts 'wandered' the location of the poles by 10 degrees in latitude, or about 186 miles.  To put that in perspective, the Moon's total diameter is 2,159 miles.  Is

His work led him to discover that asteroid impacts ‘wandered’ the location of the poles by 10 degrees in latitude, or about 186 miles. To put that in perspective, the Moon’s total diameter is 2,159 miles. Is

Vishnu Viswanathan, a NASA Goddard scientist who led the study, said in a statement: ‘Based on the Moon’s cratering history, polar wander appears to be moderate enough for water to remain in shadow near the poles and enjoy stable conditions over billions of times. is of years.’

Asteroid impacts excavate the mass and leave depressions in the surface, or pockets of lower mass, but the Moon will re-orient itself to bring those pockets toward the poles – while areas of higher mass can be removed through centrifugal force. bring to the equator.

As NASA a . noted in blog postThis is the same force that causes pizza dough to stretch when a chef tosses it and rolls it into the air.

‘If you look at the Moon with all these craters, you can see in the gravitational field data,’ said David Smith, principal investigator of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter. ‘I thought, “Why not just suck out one of those craters, remove the sign completely?”‘

Top, left: The Hammer projection map centered at 270° E shows an uneven distribution of craters with a diameter of 20–150 km.  Above, right: Map of Lunar Gravitational Anomalies Degrees and Orders 650 .  extended to

Top, left: The Hammer projection map centered at 270° E shows an uneven distribution of craters with a diameter of 20–150 km. Above, right: Map of Lunar Gravitational Anomalies Degrees and Orders 650 . extended to

The study comes at a time when NASA's troubled Artemis 1 mega-rocket (above) is facing cryogenic testing this week and a potential launch attempt — pending multiple conditions — will take 70 minutes on Sept. 27, with a backup on Sept. during the window.  2

The study comes at a time when NASA’s troubled Artemis 1 mega-rocket (above) is facing cryogenic testing this week and a potential launch attempt — pending multiple conditions — will take 70 minutes on Sept. 27, with a backup on Sept. during the window. 2

Both Artemis 3 and China's Chang'e-7 identify sites near Shackleton, Howarth and Nobel craters as potential landing zones (the area circled in red above).  These areas of overlap have shadowy craters that can trap water-ice.

Both Artemis 3 and China’s Chang’e-7 identify sites near Shackleton, Howarth and Nobel craters as potential landing zones (the area circled in red above). These areas of overlap have shadowy craters that can trap water-ice.

was published in that for their study planetary science magazineViswanathan, Smith and their colleagues worked with about 5,200 craters, ranging in size from 12 miles to 746 miles wide.

He devised computer models to take the coordinates and widths of the craters to infer their gravitational signatures.

Then they ran simulations that removed the gravitational signature – essentially setting the clock back to 4.25 billion years ago.

The study comes at a time when NASA’s troubled Artemis 1 mega-rocket is facing cryogenic testing this week and a potential launch attempt – pending multiple conditions – during a 70-minute window on September 27 with a backup on October 2. . If those dates don’t expire, NASA won’t be able to try again until October 17th at the earliest.

In addition, the space agency recently called on China to be “open and transparent” with its lunar missions following the revelation of overlap between the two countries in potential landing sites near the lunar surface’s South Pole region.

‘We will continue to share our plans with the world as we are able, and hope that other nations will share their plans with us. We encourage transparency and peaceful exploration of space in accordance with the principles of the Artemis Agreement and the Outer Space Treaty, the US space agency previously told DailyMail.com.

Both Artemis 3 and China’s Chang’e-7 identify sites near Shackleton, Howarth and Nobel Crater as possible landing areas. These areas of overlap have shadowy craters that can trap water-ice.

“In exploring the Moon, we will adhere to what is written in the Artemis Agreement—that we will be transparent about all activities, operate in a safe and responsible manner, and avoid harmful interference,” NASA said.

Sander said, “There are some things that we haven’t noticed yet, but one thing we want to point out is the small craters that people are ignoring, they really matter, so the main point here It is,” said Sander. Gossens, a Goddard planetary scientist who participated in the study.

Although researchers studying polar wander have removed the crater from the record, they have removed only about two dozen of the largest impacts.

“People assumed that small craters were insignificant,” Viswanathan said. ‘They are negligible individually, but collectively they have a huge impact.’

NASA said,

“In exploring the Moon, we will adhere to what is set out in the Artemis Agreement—that we will be transparent about all activities, operate in a safe and responsible manner, and avoid harmful interference,” NASA said.

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